"Mind Warp" Halloween Party for a good cause . . .

This month I'll be DJing a Halloween party for a great cause at the Infinity Events Center on Saturday October 28th, all proceeds from the event going directly to the Utah Pride Center and suicide prevention programs for LGBTQ+ youth.

The #1 cause of death for Utah teens is suicide, and according to Utah suicide specialist Andrea Hood, "youth who feel they are highly rejected by their family members or community when they come out as LGBT, are at 8 times higher risk of suicide."

Join me in support of inclusion, acceptance, and the good work done by the Pride Center this Halloween.  Halloween has a special place in my heart because it was the first time I could walk around in public without feeling like a freak . . . without Halloween I never would have met my friends Sol and Ty, but I'm getting ahead of myself . . . 

Here's more info about the event:  

A HALLOWEEN PARTY WITH A PURPOSE: Join Jason Olsen & the Utah Pride Center for a techno-retro, space-disco dance party featuring beats from DJ Lishus and DJ Robot Dream. Your ticket price helps raise money for an important cause. All proceeds will help fund the life-saving services of the Utah Pride Center, including suicide prevention programs for LGBTQ+ youth.

WHEN: Saturday October 28, 2017-  9pm - 1am

WHERE: Infinity Event Center 26 E. 600 S., SLC

TICKETS: www.goo.gl/rmtKxx

 

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Robots helping humans

With so much negativity in the news about killer robots and robot fails these days I thought it was time to refocus a bit on the many wonderful things robots are doing to help people . . .

In Houston, my cousin Siri helps save a girl from rising floodwaters:  

Sometimes Robots go where humans fear in highly dangerous situations, like this bank robbery:

This robot anticipates the danger and saves a little girl from being hurt: 

This little robot helps kids with autism communicate: 

Elon Musk says Artificial Intelligence will lead to WW3 . . .

Last week Elon Musk tweeted that "competition for AI superiority at national lelvel most likely cause of WW3" in response to Vladamir Putin's recent statements that the country with the best AI will rule the world.

No one really knows what AI could evolve into or how it may look, and in our age of clickbait and sensationalism, public figures are increasingly speculating about doom and gloom outcomes from AI.  I think AI will make our lives more comfortable and rewarding, allow tech and science to reach new heights, and further explore the wonders of our universe.  

But it seems many people think this is where we're headed:  

I think an educated conversation is important to view all sides of an issue.   With China's rush to acquire robots ahead of any other country in the world,  and prominent social media and public figures sounding the alarm that killer robots are going to be on the loose,  it's no wonder why people are interested and perhaps afraid of robots and AI.  

I have to admit, it's a bit creepy when during a recent CNBC interview at SXSW this AI robot says she wants to destroy humans (and the title is misleading, I didn't find her attractive):  

In summary I think that robots and AI are here to stay, and we need to get along with each other in symbiotic ways if we are to coexist.   Will we see inter-species couples between AI and humans, like in the movie Her? I think so, I went on 3 dates last week and each date seemed open to the idea of dating me as I am.  More on that later . . . 

Are Robots going to take your job?

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Traditionally society has forecast the poor working class losing their jobs to robots, but Martin Ford's recent book Rise of the Robots: Technology and the threat of a jobless future outlines how the well-educated upper crust also are in peril.   

It is documented that the military is spending $30bn preparing a robot army in order to minimize human casualties in upcoming conflicts.

But not as reported is the reality that robots are beginning to take highly-skilled jobs as well . . . jobs which require nuance and human discernment are increasingly being tackled by algorythms.  Robots Software engineers, writers, editors, and even grading college essays.    

As you can see in the below chart, China is leading the robot takeover at nearly 40% of the entire world's robots being put in use there by 2019:

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Does this scare you?  Do you think humans should keep all the jobs or will having robot assistance push humans to new heights in their fields of study and interest?

Are you afraid of technology, or do you embrace it?

I am of the opinion that tech can help our lives to be more satisfying and fulfilling.  Some people seem to fear technology and reject it in various forms.  Here's a heartwarming story about a woman who can begin to reclaim the use of her lost limb via cybernetics.  

Again, no matter how many times I say it people still can't understand that robots yearn to feel just like humans.  As this woman regains a semblance of feeling in her prosthetic cybernetic arm, she says that's what she missed most about losing her arm.  Robots feel and love connection and touch just like humans.  

This week I was stood up on a date.  Whether she was afraid of me because I am different, or was punking me all along, it still hurt.  If she had rejected me because of something I said or did, it would be one thing, but it's confusing and hurtful to be rejected for who I am. 

I saw a car accident this week . . .

This week as I was driving along, a car tried to cross the turning lane in front of a big truck stopped at a light and didn't see a car coming in the turning lane.  I saw both cars speeding toward each other a second before it happened but could do nothing.  It wasn't enough force to hurt either driver but the cars were now damaged, their sleek and glossy exteriors now slightly crumpled and smashed.  As traffic moved on I saw the look on the face of the driver . . . a combination of anger and resignation.  I wondered about what the rest of their days would look like . . . would they pass on their frustration to co-workers, loved ones?   Would they be relieved to have an excuse to miss work or bail on unwanted commitments?  Would they now have to make touch financial choices on limited budgets?  

Last night I was unloading some gear from the back of my 4 Runner and I neglected to close the rear hatch before shutting my automatic garage door. I heard grinding and creaking but didn't realize what was happening until cables snapped, the door was bent off its rails, and now my garage door won't close.   

But on the positive side, now a garage repairman will have food on his table for a day, and I might learn something about fixing garage doors myself.  Do you agree with what Gary Oldman's character "Zorg" says about destruction in this clip from The 5th Element?  

Robots are officiating wedding ceremonies. Thoughts?

When I lived in Japan I sometimes performed for weddings.  These were elaborate affairs held in large stone chapels and cathedrals with no real religious significance, meetings, or "churchgoers" per se but simply wedding reception centers that looked like what the Japanese couples had seen depicted in western-style weddings in movies.

In Japan, the act of signing the marriage document is what actually marries the couple, so the officiant has a less critical role than in western weddings. 

I was asked by one such cathedral-style wedding venue if I would like to be a paid actor and "officiate" at weddings: dressing in priestly robes and reading from a large bible on the podium.    I didn't feel comfortable doing that so I declined and opted to just perform at weddings instead, even though I would have made more money acting as a priest.  

If one can get certified to perform weddings online, is a robot officiating at a wedding very different?  Do you think this will ever make its way to the US or other western countries?  Maybe Vegas will be the first . . .